How do I take care of young Bumble Bee Toads?


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Bumble Bee toadlet, just out of the water.

Caring for Young Bumble Bee Toads
After the toadlets have emerged from the water, it’s time to remove them from the rain chamber and place them in rearing containers. At Josh’s Frogs, we use sterilite bins that measure approximately 24”x15”x6”. A piece of glass provides a sealed top, especially useful to maintain the high humidity newly morphed bumble bee toads require to thrive. A shallow later of moistground coconut fiber is used as a substrate, with a few handfuls of long fiber sphagnum moss is provided for the bumble bee toads to take shelter in, as well as a few plant clippings. Young bumble bee toads are fed springtails daily that have been dusted with a vitamin/mineral supplement. Dusting springtails can be tricky – we use a straw to blow springtails out of their culture into a larger bin, then into a 32oz cup, where they are dusted with Repashy Calcium Plus. Repashy Calcium Plus is finer than many other supplements available, and seems to stick better to the springtails.

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Captive Bred bumble bee toad, at one month of age.

Bumble bee toadlets grow quickly, and eat more than you would believe. The most common way to fail with the toadlets is to not feed enough. After 8-10 weeks of eating springtails, most bumble bee toads will be able to eat melanogaster fruit flies. At this point, the young bumble bee toads are ready for their new home.

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